Mostly Harmless
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rosesopeaches:

₊˚ʚ 🍑 ︰♡ roses and peaches ♡︰↷ 🍑 ꒷

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vvitch-mist:

not-caused-by-those-who-love:

conservatives-arekilling-america:

it’s like they have board meetings where they say “what’s the least true thing we can say to scare people”

It’s police propaganda, and racism. Cops have to look necessary, so they say violent crime is on the rise and we all know who cops target more often than anyone.

I live in NYC and everyone always talks about being tough on crime. BITCH! What!? In this city!? Have you not looked up this city’s history. It’s NOT that bad lol.

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honorthegods:

ladymaxunicron:

kaijuno:

Even when people have Alzheimer’s or dementia they don’t ever lose their humanity. My grandma had really bad Alzheimer’s in the end and even though she didn’t know any of her family anymore she was so kind and gentle with my baby nephew. It means something, I think, that caring for others is so ingrained in our psyche that not even disease could make us lose that

One of the most profound moments of my life was when I was walking with one of the Alzheimer patients through the gardens at the assisted living home I worked at a few years ago. He was a scientist, he was from out west. He’d done foundational research on the aftermath of the Mount St. Helens eruption. He looked up at one of the pine trees and misidentified it, thinking it was a California pine tree (yeah, apparently there are east coast/west coast variants) and as we got closer, he sort of frowned and said, “No, that’s <insert scientific name here>.” And he looked at me and asked, “Wait, am I in the South?” And he looked so confused and scared and I nodded and said, “Yeah, you moved here a couple years ago.” And his face got all serious and he didn’t say anything else for a minute. I could see the panic and the dread and the embarrassment starting to rise.

So I asked him about the plants, about their scientific names, about what role they played in the ecosystem, what the shape of their leaves said about their evolution, what kind of bugs lived on them, whether or not small animals made nests and homes in them. And he just talked and talked, told me everything I wanted to know.

If he forgot something, he didn’t get embarrassed because he was just thinking about some old plants, just some old plants, who can keep track of all those latin names anyway? He’d think of it later.

And it didn’t teach me to “respect everyone no matter their mental ability,” and it didn’t make me realize that “all people deserve respect,” because I was already there, I already believed that. But, as he started smiling, telling me all he knew, rolling his eyes when I didn’t understand something, thinking carefully about how to explain in lay-terms, as the stress and fear that threatened to crush him evaporated as quickly as it appeared, I received an absolutely critical life lesson like a ten-ton epiphany:

We were made to help each other.

As cheesy as it sounds, the absolute true meaning of life, outside of religious beliefs, scientific theories, political movements, outside of all of it, the only thing that matters at all is whether or not you made a real, tangible difference for the better in someone’s life. Big or small. Permanent or brief.

Make a difference, be the change you want to see in the world; it doesn’t make you Gandhi, but it might help someone have a better day, and isn’t that nice?

“…humans were made to help others. And when we do help others — or help them to do something — we’re doing what we were designed for. We perform our function.”

  • Marcus Aurelius
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limetimo:

galileoace:

Oh no.

Video description: person unpacking and demonstrating an electronic chess set from the 1980s as they speak. The chess set is gray in colour, the brand is TANDY. The person’s keyboard is visible on the desk where the demonstration takes place, the keys were replaced with lego bricks of varying colours. The video is captioned.

This is an electronic chess set from the 1980s. Except it has a problem… It’s missing a piece. (Note: The missing piece is a black pawn.) It uses magnets to keep track of the board so that the built in AI can mess you up, which means I can’t just use any old chess piece as a replacement. I’ll need to make my own. So I took some measurements… modelled it up in CAD… sliced it… then 3D printed it… and glued in a magnet. It looks almost identical. The board doesn’t actually move the pieces by itself. It just lights up the rows and columns, so that you move it where it wants. It looks like I’m playing against myself in this time lapse, but in reality, the board is making all the decision for black. The only thing left was to fix the hinge that I broke while I was making this video. So I just glued a small piece of plastic back in into place- (The missing pawn falls out of the chessboard’s insides.) oh… /End video description

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headspace-hotel:assuming-dinosaur:bogleech: revretch:iamthekaijuking: revretch: calloutnevvegas: p...

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headspace-hotel:

assuming-dinosaur:

bogleech:

revretch:

iamthekaijuking:

revretch:

calloutnevvegas:

prokopetz:

You wouldn’t think that flamingoes are extremophiles just from looking at them. It’s like somebody tried to build the vertebrate equivalent of that fungus that lives inside nuclear reactors, and ended up with a gangly pink dinosaur with a spoon for a face.

For everyone in the comments asking how flamingos are extremophiles:

Flamingos can survive in low oxygen, high altitude, high temperatures, low temperatures, high alkaline, they can and will drink boiling water and they can be completely frozen at night and still get up the next morning

Don’t fuck with flamingos

….. Didn’t know most of that

Huh… so that’s why zoos don’t put them somewhere warm during winter.

Oh yeah, this leaves out what I *did* know about them–they can also survive hypersalinity. That is, water so salty it kills practically everything else–water so salty it burns your skin.

American flamingos just drink that shit

(animal death) this is a real undoctored photograph (*though the body was stood up for the shot) of a dead flamingo on the surface of lake natron, a lake so salty and so alkaline that it’s naturally carbonated like soda and would eat through your stomach lining if you drank from it.

When this photo went viral years ago, most people assumed this poor flamingo must have been killed by the lake.

It is actually the lake where 75% of its global population are hatched. This is a photo from the same lake:

Some species of flamingo actually subsist almost entirely on a diet of bacteria! In other words, there is a species of dinosaur that eats only bacteria and lives in lakes so toxic they would kill almost anything else—and it is best known to the average person as a kitschy lawn decoration.

Earth is an amazing place.

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mrs-misty-eyed:

stupid-dyke:

mysharona1987:

I’m gonna keep repeating myself that I really think the entire pro life movement exists so that American conservatives can have one single issue that lets them assume a moral high ground, to distract from the fact that their entire ideology is completely hostile to human life.

she really read “i ignore infant mortality rates in the poorest states” and agreed.

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